Carter: “It’s like life coming together…”

Carter

“I first came to Double T in September. I used to come once a week to see Annabel who I met through the job centre actually. For me personally I didn’t want to go to the job centre for help but I’m glad I did because I wouldn’t have met Annabel and I wouldn’t have been in a job right now.I feel like it’s turned my whole life around. The way I feel now, and the things I’m doing now, it’s not like the way I felt a few weeks ago. I worked towards it too, I put in the effort.”

Carter, 20 from Forest Fields.


What were you doing before you came to Double T?

“I was just working in bars, clubs and restaurants which was ok but not great. I went to school and then to college to do ICT and Business which wasn’t what I was really interested in but it was what other people wanted me to do.  I did fashion in my first year so it was a bit of a weird jump but everyone was hassling me to be more professional so, like an idiot, I listened. I should’ve carried on what I was doing, I don’t want a career in IT, it’s so boring but I’ve learnt a lot, like how to use Excel to a good standard and other Microsoft things which is good for businesses when you’re applying for jobs, so that does help me.”


What sort of help have you had then?

“Well, just like grants and stuff, and they helped me get my citizenship application through the YNot charity. I’ve been in the country since I was about one year old but I never got it. My mum was a single mum, she paid for everything by herself so she couldn’t really find the spare money to do it. Annabel helped me get that and it’s like, a big weight off my shoulders. It really does help because I’ve got leave to remain, I think that’s what it’s called, but for some employers it’s a bit confusing and embarrassing and awkward sometimes, explaining it to them.

“Getting citizenship makes things a lot easier, you can work without it but you have to like go the long way around things and with citizenship things are a lot quicker.”


What job are you doing now?

“Where I work now, at NCHA, we have vulnerable people who live on the site in their own flats and we go in and try to encourage them to be independent. We clean up, go shopping, and assist them with things. We’re not carers but we do support them, and that’s what I do. I enjoy it,
they come to you with problems and you get to talk to them and build up a relationship with some of them, especially if you’re their key worker. The team is really great, I think it’s like a really good place to work and a really good company to work for. Annabel’s really helpful, and she’s good with that, she picked out the job and gave me a reference. I would never have applied for it but she picked it out and gave me the confidence to apply.”


What would you say to someone in the position you were in?

“I think if I hadn’t been told about Double T by the job centre, I wouldn’t have come. I mean, people always come to you claiming to be able to help or something and I just didn’t really get what she did but for anyone who’s doubting it or unsure, if they’re looking for work or just want help with any type of issue, anything, like confidence things, education, I’d say definitely say just come and talk to her.

“I said thank you to Annabel but she said I put in the effort.  She asked me to come in the mornings and meet her in town or wherever, and I did that; it’s not like she was asking to move a mountain and she’s helping you so it’s what you’ve got to do.

I’d deffo tell people to go for it and like, it’s not a waste of time. I feel like she could help me, and my situation is so like weird and awkward sometimes and different and some people’s situations aren’t even that awkward, so I’d feel like she could help you too so I’d say go for it.”


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